Tag Archives: Google Maps

UK Wide Public Transport – What About Google Maps or Moovit?

When I published my post about whether anyone could bring the level of flair Citymapper has shown in London to UK wide travel I not surprisingly got some comments back about services I had missed. To be fair I deliberately didn’t list off all the many public transit apps, as there are absolutely loads out there, however I thought I’d discuss two which came up, Google Maps and Moovit.

If you believe the Daily Mail Google Maps now has real time data for the whole of the UK, unfortunately like a lot of articles that appear in the paper, or on their website that is total rubbish. If you read the actual Google Press Release what the said is this:

We’ve added every single transit route in Great Britain to Google Maps—making it easier to get anywhere from Land’s End to John O’Groats.

They then say that they’ve added real-time information for Vancouver and Chicago, they don’t say anywhere that they have added real-time information for the UK. If you click through to the post by their GB product manager this explains that they’ve taken schedule information from National Express and Traveline so essentially what they’ve added is a much nicer interface to the existing UK wide travel planners. Basically somebody at the Daily Mail can’t actually read a press release properly, and certainly didn’t bother to check the actual site to see what is going on.

Screenshot 2014-07-05 22.19.27Doing what the Daily Mail didn’t bother to do taking a look at Waterloo Station in Google Maps, for the Underground station they list the scheduled times of the trains, which might be a bit of surprise to most travellers on the tube, that there is actually a timetable!

Screenshot 2014-07-05 22.19.00Swapping over to Citymapper we have the actual departures in real-time, as they have for stations all across London.

Screenshot 2014-07-05 21.59.45Things are even more sparse when it comes to National Rail – although route planning from Waterloo will bring up accurate times, there are no departures on the Google site.

Screenshot 2014-07-05 21.57.26Taking a look at the same station in Citymapper you get a complete list of realtime departures. Citymapper being London focused has live departures for key commuter routes outside the capital, for example they have departures for Reading station.

The situation is much the same when you look at the smartphone applications – no real-time data on Google, loads within London for Citymapper.

IMG_4133Moving on to Moovit, once again the issue is real-time data. They are a bit better than Google, in that they do have some real-time data, specifically for some buses, but once again they don’t have the real-time data fields for National Rail. Looking at Reading this time, this is an example of what Moovit might show – note the message at the bottom mentioning that real-time departures will be highlighted in Orange.

IMG_4132This iPhone screenshot is from the app of an excellent site called Realtime Trains that is a trainspotters paradise in terms of the , so that app is telling me platform numbers, whether a train is running late, and interestingly has a different departure time than Moovit is presenting.

That also highlights another problem, the quality of the data in Moovit. One of the app store reviews comments that all the bus times on the reviewers local route were ten minutes out. It’s also remarkably difficult to find London Euston station on Moovit – it has Euston Square station and the Underground station, but the only way to actually get to see the scheduled departures from Euston using the app is to find the station on the map and click on it – it doesn’t come up in searches at all. Reading departures can equally be problematic when searching by hand as the app retains the historic split between the old Reading Southern Region station and the Reading Great Western station even though physically they’ve long since become one station. This means that there are two icons for Reading station almost on top of each other and two separate lists of departures.

I have to say, I really want to like Moovit – as an avid user of Waze crowdsourcing public transport data seems a great idea. The developers seem to have come up with a way of tracking journeys that doesn’t decimate your battery level, but without accurate schedules and using all the available real-time data that is available for buses, trains and the Underground it is pretty useless, where Citymapper excels is that it tells me what is actually happening, not what should be happening. There is also a split between Scotland and England which none of the other route planning apps have which makes it impossible to plan a trip that goes over the border – whilst it may be argued that they are splitting by country, the actual underlying data they’re using for the schedules is UK wide resulting in the trains for Scotland apparently only being available on the English area, so it seems a slightly arbitrary split that renders Moovit even more problematic and unnecessarily so.

So my initial conclusion remains, even taking into account Google Maps and Moovit, there is still no UK wide multi-modal public transport application with the flair of Citymapper – who is going to produce one? Will Google introduce real-time data? Will Moovit sort out their schedule data and add in more real-time? Or will Citymapper expand out to cover the whole of the UK?

Can You Trust User Generated Mapping?

A couple of days ago The Next Web ran an interesting and detailed article about the rise of Open Street Map and their ongoing attempt to compete with Google Maps as the go to mapping solution.

Open Street Map data has achieved several notable successes as companies have switched from using Google data to theirs, but the critical question is whether the data is any good?

I have a bit of a love/hate relationship with user generated mapping solutions. As you will see elsewhere on my blog I’m running Open Street Map based maps on my handheld GPS, and my satnav of choice is Waze, which although it doesn’t use Open Street Map, uses maps made in a similar way with user generated mapping.

The strength of both platforms is that anybody can edit the map, so problems get solved a lot quicker than errors in the major suppliers maps get sorted, but that is also their biggest weakness.

IMG_3839I’ll give an example, a couple of weeks ago I was driving to work, and I came across this on the map just south of Eversley, a route I drive most days.

To explain what you’re looking at, the map was showing that the roundabout where the B3272 splits from the A327 was about five times as big as it actually is, and was a residential street rather than a main highway.

Getting home and taking a look on the Waze map editor confirmed there was a problem with the map data.

IMG_3841What you can see on here is the editor view overlaid on a satellite view of the same junction. The roundabout is highlighted in red which indicates that there is missing location data for the road. Checking the road elements the new roundabout had been put in place by a new user who had done little editing before, and who had obviously accidentally damaged the map at that point, messed it up and left it. The problem of course being that nobody else spotted it until it was too late and the update went out to all the users.

To the credit of the community shortly after this screenshot was taken one of the higher level editors sorted the problem as needless to say it got reported fairly quickly, and unlike errors in TomTom or Garmin maps the fix appeared on my copy of Waze within three or four days.

Screen Shot 2014-03-01 at 22.50.53Of course the professional mapping firms don’t get it right. For example this is the dual carriageway that Google Maps has on the B3272 in the middle of Eversley Cross – if you live near Eversley you’ll be forgiven for having missed it previously. What they have now is a bit of an improvement over what they had originally where the westbound carriageway followed the footpath across the front of the houses fronting on to the green.

Screen Shot 2014-03-01 at 22.48.50There is also this long standing problem in Camberley on the TomTom maps. Again it’s been improved over time but it still incorrectly labels Charles Street as New Southern Road, and still has two connections at the northern end of Southern Road that just don’t exist.

Screenshot 2014-03-01 23.00.26In both of those cases, Waze and OpenStreetMap are right, this is the Eversley Cross dual carriageway on OpenStreetMap.

So can you trust User Generated Mapping?

I’d say that you can trust it to the same extent as “professional” mapping – both have errors and problems and you need to be aware of that and use your common sense using them as you should with any map, even one with the long established reputation of the paper Ordnance Survey maps. The key advantages that user generated mapping can bring is that if there are mistakes they get sorted quickly, and new roads or changed layouts will often appear in Waze or OpenStreetMap long before they turn up in one of the periodic updates for a regular satnav.

Really the comparison of Wikipedia with OpenStreetMap is a good one, both are excellent sources of information, as long as you are aware that they might be wrong…

Got a Google Places Page for your business? Not any more…

If you’ve got yourself a Google Places page for your business, organisation or group, as we have for the church, you really need to read this article:
Google Places Is Over, Company Makes Google+ The Center Of Gravity For Local SearchSearch Engine Land.

Whilst for a while you’ve been able to add your organisation to Google, now all the existing organisations in Google Places have automatically been moved across. Whilst it makes sense to not have two services for essentially the same thing, Google Places page owners are obviously going to have to give themselves a quick crash course in Google+ to get the best out of it!

Macworld Keynote 2008

It has to be said, I’ve not been massively excited by the past couple of Macworld Keynotes – either they’ve been things I’ve not really been interested in buying, or things that weren’t available outside the USA, or both.

It’s a bit different this year. The keynote included for key announcements, all of which were interesting to some extent or another.

First off there was Time Capsule, which is effectively the Apple take on Network Attached Storage, and is closely tied in to the Time Machine backup utility that shipped as part of Leopard.

Now it has to be said, that I couldn’t see a pressing reason to upgrade to Leopard, despite all the glowing reviews that were quoted (even from a PC magazine). Although Time Machine was a nice idea, I wasn’t looking to supplant my current backup solution which uses SuperDuper! to produce a fully bootable clone of my main drives. What I wanted to do was use a network attached storage, but although my current solution, a Buffalo Terastation worked fine for a PC, the claimed Apple support was absolutely lousy – and no amount of hacking around has seemed to improve it.

In typical Apple fashion, the Time Capsule is a plug-in and go solution, just turn it on, tell Time Machine, and off it goes, automatically backing up the drives over the network.

I suspect of all the new kit that was on show today, this will probably be the top of the list – the Terastation will remain for the PC backups, but an upgrade to Leopard and a Time Capsule will almost certainly be on the shopping list pretty soon.

Next up is the iPhone updates. Now however fantastic the user experience is with the iPhone, from my point of view it still needs to be 3G. Having said that, keeping a regular phone and having an iPod Touch as a PDA seemed to be a possibility – more so now, as alongside the new toys on the iPhone, Apple have released some of the extra applications onto the iPod Touch. Chief amongst those is the mail client – which will make a big difference, but they’ve also included the new iPhone version of Google Maps. The main feature that doesn’t work is the my location – but that is pretty ropey even on my regular mobile, but in terms of usability with the multi-touch gestures that the iPod Touch supports it is streets ahead of the client on any other mobile device. Suffice to say that when iTunes offered me the upgrade to my iPod Touch tonight, it wasn’t really much of a choice to install it, and I have to say as well, having played with the other applications, a 3G iPhone is looking a really attractive proposition compared to the current competition.

After that we had Apple taking a second stab at the Apple TV. Now it’s fair to say that this is one product that hasn’t been a massive success up to now. Certainly when I first saw it I wasn’t enthused. For take two, Apple are taking on the movie rental market. The requirement to have a computer is gone, effectively all you need is a TV, the Apple TV, and a broadband connection, and then you can rent movies, get TV shows, music, pictures from Flickr and videos from YouTube. If you’ve got a computer, the box will also sync up media with that as before. The real boon though is that they are renting high definition copies of the movies, and again, it’s all just point and click – compared to current solutions where it seems to score is the ease of use. Of course in UK terms, it will really come down to the quality of the available content, so it’s a definite wait and see on this one.

The last big announcement was not the much predicted touch-screen MacBook, however it was a new laptop, and one designed to slot in between the consumer MacBook line and the professional MacBook Pro, filling the gap left by the missing ultra portable pro laptop that was the 12“ Powerbook. What was shown was the Macbook Air, the worlds thinnest laptop. On a purely technological level it is impressive how thin the laptop actually is – amazing compared to most of the laptops people lug around. However screen wise it’s a reasonable size – 13â€?, the same as the MacBook, it also has a decent sized keyboard, and comes with an 80gb hard drive and 2gb RAM. What is amazing is quite how thin it is – a wedge shape 4mm at the front, and 19.4mm at the back, and it weighs in at just over 1Kg. With the same graphics as the MacBook it’s not going to be great games wise, but as an easy to carry laptop it’s great. Price wise it’s not too bad, at just under £1200 for the basic model – although that shoots up to over £2000 if you want the solid state disk option. Alongside this, the laptop introduces a lot of the gestures that appeared on the iPhone and iPod Touch – so it definitely would be a tempting package if I were in the market for a laptop – especially as just like all the other Apple machines you can dual boot into Windows too.

So in terms of the coolest thing announced, it’s certainly the new laptop, but from a personal practical point of view it’s the iPod Touch update and the Time Capsule that are probably what I’m going to end up using… Having said that, it certainly was a great keynote. The whole show is now up on the Apple site so you can ooh and aah along with the Apple faithful, and also proof that in even the best prepared presentations things don’t always quite go according to plan.

Alternatively, if you haven’t got ninety minutes to spend – this is the whole thing compressed into sixty seconds:

Apple Time Capsule originally uploaded by rustybrick

MacBook AIR-04 originally uploaded by Bogdan….

Google Maps Mobile – My Location

News today that there is a new version of Google Maps for Mobile alongside there now being a Symbian native version it also includes a ‘My Location’ feature that triangulates an approximate location based on the cell towers the phone can communicate with. So away I go downloading it – runs great, aside from the ‘My Location’ feature which produces an error that my location is temporarily unavailable. Anybody managed to get it to work on an N73 running X-Series on 3?

Google Maps Atlantic Swimmers

There have been variations of this Google Maps weirdness floating around on e-mail recently, the most common being New York to London, but essentially the ‘swim the Atlantic’ line occurs for any route between places on either side of the pond thanks to the addition of a route on the map between the ferry terminal in Le Havre, and the end of Long Wharf in Boston. For example, check out this route from the heart of the Kremlin to the White House in Washington DC, and this is apparently the longest route possible at 15,289 miles…

Another Cool Google Toy

Google Mobile Maps on my K750i

Grabbing a copy of Google Earth today the download page pointed me in the direction of other things that I might find interesting, one of which was Google Mobile Maps. Essentially what it does is take the underlying database used by regular Google Maps, but put a J2ME front end onto the data so that you can access it from a mobile phone.

Of course with the volume of data that Google Maps chucks around, you’d expect the performance to not be exactly stellar, however I was really impressed by the speed with which it generated maps. I put in our post code and it zipped straight to our street. It even has the same choice as the full size Google Maps to switch to a satellite view – the shot above shows the satellite view of the Church.

But it’s not just the maps that have made the transition, it also hooks up to the search facilities to allow you to find local amenities such as restaurants and hotels. Coupled with the fact that it includes the Get Directions facility and it is a fantastic little package. Of course you’ll probably end up paying for it in data charges, but if you find yourself needing a map, all you need now is your mobile phone, nothing else. In fact the only feature it actually lacks, is the ability to work out roughly where you are but I suspect that may turn up at some point too. Even if it’s not something you’re going to use a lot, Google Mobile Maps is definitely a useful tool to have installed onto your phone for an emergency.