Tag Archives: Pictures

For the Unbelievers

Talking to our friend Meli on the phone earlier in the week, I happened to mention the first place that Beth taught in Canada where they had a horse drawn school bus, because the temperature often got cold enough that the diesel in the normal bus would freeze.

It has to be said, that Meli didn’t believe me – and thought I was making it up to pull her leg or something. As a result, Beth has dug out her old photo albums to produce the photographic evidence, which she has uploaded to Flickr. The set does include pictures of the actual school bus. She has also included a few other old pictures as well with a set from her second school including one of those fantastic sunsets where it looks like the sky is on fire. Beth has written a bit more about the pictures on her blog.

Yes, Really! originally uploaded by Tahbepet

Flickr Loves You – A Lot…

Apologies to anybody on my Facebook friends list if you turn up in any pictures I have on Flickr – I’ve come across a new Facebook/Flickr application called Flickr Loves You that provides much better Facebook integration than my previous choice zuPort: Flickr, specifically it provides the people tagging feature that regular Facebook pictures support.

I had a good go at trying out the tagging feature last night, as anyone who happens to turn up in my pictures on Flickr a lot – and as with regular Facebook pictures it notifies you that I’ve tagged you – apparently every time I do it. So for everybody involved in the Bakinghammer Wedding, you’ll be pleased to hear I’ve done that batch of pictures…

Record Breaking Numbers?

Glowing Christingles

We’re in the middle of the busiest time at St James. Last night was the traditional Nine Lessons and Carols service, that had a record breaking 302 people attend – with people stood packed into the vestry, and stood in the North Aisle – apparently it got so hot in the building that the organ went out of tune… It certainly seems like we’re going to have to do the same as we do with the Christingle services, and run the whole thing twice next year in order to accommodate everybody who wants to attend.

Today we had the four Christingle services. We were on duty for the 2pm and 4pm services, with Beth acting as sidesperson and looking after the sound system, whilst I discovered a new calling as a doorman keeping track of who was coming in, and more importantly collecting unused tickets that people had got ‘just in case’ to allow the one or two people who turn up on the off chance an opportunity to get in. Thanks to the flu bug doing the rounds in the village there were quite a few returns, although at the 4pm, those were all used, and one family decided to come back for the 6pm service as there were no seats left at 4pm – so it looks like we’ll get somewhere between 600 and 800 people through the doors for those services alone – and we haven’t even got to Christmas itself.

The Midnight Communion is usually packed – so on the basis of the turnout last night we’re expecting to be jam packed – quite how we can expand capacity at that service I don’t know. We’re then back up for the 11am service tomorrow morning – although there is also an 8am and 9:30am service too. Certainly it’s looking like we may well have another record in terms of the number of people through the doors over the Christmas period.

We have a few pictures of the 4pm Christingle service up on my Flickr stream, although as usual with shots of this service the majority are restricted access because of all the children in the pictures.

Flickr Places

Flickr have recently added a neat new variation onto their explore pages called Flickr Places.

The idea is relatively simple in that it is wrapping the place search that gets used when placing your pictures onto a map into a much simpler interface. Given a place name, it then goes away and builds a page using any of the geotagged pictures, and comes up with a page containing all those that are in the relevant place.

Of course, it is entirely dependant on people religiously geotagging all their pictures, otherwise you get results like the Finchampstead page which seems to entirely consist of my pictures…

Facebook Style People Tagging for Flickr

Although photo sites such as Flickr offer a multitude of features for people to work with their digital photographs, in a lot of cases the average user is only really looking for somewhere simple to post their pictures and share them with friends – hence why more general sites such as Facebook are proving popular places to post pictures. There are even ways to integrate the two – Facebook applications like zuPort: Flickr can pull all your Flickr shots into your Facebook profile without the hassle of double posting.

Having said that, there are one or two features in the way Facebook handles pictures – related to it’s social features – that at first glance are totally absent from Flickr – chief amongst them being the people tagging.

If you’ve not seen this, this particular feature allows you to highlight particular people in your pictures and if they are on Facebook too link to their profile. This allows you to do quite clever searches, finding all pictures on Facebook that have been taken by anybody.

So the question is, why, with it’s massively more powerful tagging and note making abilities why Flickr doesn’t appear to do it? The simple answer is that it does – it’s just that in amongst all the other features it’s not as obvious – nor immediately as straightforward.

I was already aware of the ability to tag Flickr pictures with what are termed as machine tags to link them to events held on Upcoming.org, as Flickr themselves used them for their 24 Hours of Flickr events, one of which we attended. By adding a particular machine tag, the system was able to link all the pictures of the event pretty easily back to the event page – Facebook does something similar. After a bit of digging around I found that there was a machine tag to link to another Flickr user, but it was only a tag, the other nice aspect of the Facebook solution is that it also highlights the person in the picture – easy to do with a note in Flickr but a multi-stage process compared to the simple click in Facebook.

Needless to say I’m not the first person to look at what Facebook has done and suggested it, a bit more digging and I came across this discussion which finishes off with a link to a Greasemonkey script that can be installed into any Firefox based browser that puts it all together giving almost the same functionality as is available in Facebook – select a Flickr user and it tags the picture with the right machine link, and then creates a note on the picture with the persons name linked in as well, then it’s just a question of moving the note over the relevant person, and you get a clickable link that takes you to their pictures. Maybe at some point Flickr will do something similar, but until then this little Greasemonkey script works fine – just need to go back through the couple of thousand pictures on my account and create the links…

Canada Pictures

Canadian Falls by Night

I’ve just finished uploading my pictures from our recent trip to Canada. Beth has another set from her camera that will be uploaded to her Flickr account over the next couple of days.

Currently all of mine are in a single set, but as with our earlier trip I’ll probably break down the three hundred or so pictures into more manageable sets too. I’ll also post about some of our adventures – including the float plane that took six attempts to get into the air…

As a quick overview, the first group are pictures taken at the family wedding which was the main reason for our trip, then pictures of Toronto. After that we spent a couple of days up at Parry Sound, and finally we finished off the trip at Niagara Falls.

Update: Beth’s pictures can be found here.

Holiday Pictures

Sunlight through Stained Glass

I’ve uploaded my pictures from our holiday in France. Beth has a whole load more on her camera that I’ll link to when she’s uploaded them. Most of the pictures are actually in two places as I’ve done one big set with everything, and then a number of smaller sets for particular places we went.

Looking through the pictures, you’ll spot that we went to a lot of Churches – including finally getting round to doing the abbey tour at Cluny. It is certainly worth doing if you are ever there, as you get to see inside the one remaining part of what was the largest Church in the world before St Peter’s in Rome was rebuilt. Although you can get an idea of what it looked like inside by visits to Tournus and Paray-le-Monial both of those are smaller.

We also saw some of the smaller town churches, an interesting comparison being those in Saint-Gengoux-le-National and Buxy. The building in Saint-Gengoux-le-National is in serious need of restoration – with a noticeable crack running pretty well the length of the nave in the roof, and large lumps of plaster missing from the walls. Buxy is much luckier, in that they have been able to restore the building.

Both the building at Tournus and Paray-le-Monial (Paray-le-Monial being completed since our last visit a few years ago) but with slightly different styles. Tournus has opted for some modern stained glass, which certainly the writers of the The Rough Guide to France disliked. Paray-le-Monial has a little bit of modern glass away in the transepts, but seems to have stuck with largely traditional designs, which certainly produced some good pictures as the sun shone through them. Where Paray-le-Monial has gone modern though is in the light fittings, which I initially took for sculptures – definitely a different approach to trying to ‘hide’ the lighting. They also had put very discreet recessed sockets into the floor at regularly spaced intervals on the floor of the building. Perhaps one other thing to note, particularly from someone in England where to remove them would be considered sacrilegious by some – not one of the Churches we visited had any pews at all. It’s worth considering that despite what English Heritage might say about the matter, with medieval buildings such as these, no pews is much more authentic to the original building.