Category Archives: Cuts

Is third-class Britain really on the right track?

Today was the Autumn Statement, supposed to be just an update but once again a mini-budget this was Osborne and the coalition attempting to convince the country that he knows what he’s doing, despite the fact that he’s continuing with austerity, a policy that isn’t working now, in the same way as it has never worked before.

Sadly I fear we’re stuck with this policy which if we go the same way as previous austerity programmes will see us spiralling into further recession. Considering that the other news of the day was South West Trains inability to run a railway service after 2mm of snow the Guardian combined the two stories quite nicely…

Deficit reduction that was first going to take five years was later revised to a seven-year austerity programme. That became eight on Wednesday when George Osborne admitted that a flatlining economy meant his fiscal timetable was now as reliable as Thameslink’s on a bad day. The chancellor insisted that Britain was on the right track. What he didn’t tell us was that it’s a slow moving train, with expensive tickets and uncomfortable conditions for those travelling third class.

Click here to view original web page at www.guardian.co.uk

Measuring the National Mood

Christmas Tree in the Stair WellDavid Cameron is spending loads of money trying to gauge the happiness of the peoples of the UK.

Seriously, he doesn’t need to spend all this money, there is a simple way to gauge the mood of a nation – how early do the Christmas decorations go up…

After a drought that became one of the wettest summers in years, with the non-stop rain leading to floods, a recession whose predicted length gets longer every week (now predicted to last well past the next election), and now a sudden cold snap, this weekend the country seems to have taken a collective decision that we need some cheering up!

Diamond Jubilee: The Queen no longer rules the waves

Naval reviews have been held since 1415, when Henry V surveyed the fleet gathered for the invasion of France. In this century reviews have marked the coronation of George V in 1912, the mobilisation of the fleet in 1914, the coronation of George VI in 1937, the coronation of the present Queen in 1953, her silver jubilee in 1977 and the bicentenary of Trafalgar in 2005. The Queen’s golden jubilee was another casualty of defence cuts, with no review.

via Diamond Jubilee: The Queen no longer rules the waves – Telegraph.

So does it matter that we now can’t muster enough ships for a fleet review, something that has been part of royal moments for centuries? The Telegraph certainly thinks it does…

Is This Defending the NHS?

During his time as Tory leader in opposition, David Cameron has been at pains to portray his party as the party of the NHS pledging to protect and increase spending on the British health service. Alongside that he highlights how he is a proud user of the service – his most recent child being born at an NHS hospital, his other children having been treated by the NHS. Coming into government, the talk so far has been of saving money by cutting back on bureaucracy, reducing management but leaving front line services in tact. However the inadvertent leak and subsequent official confirmation of the scrapping of NHS Direct calls that promise into question, or at least the Tory definition of a front line service. The Liberal Democrats similarly made a commitment not to cut front line services, so again, is this Nick Clegg (@nick_clegg) breaking a promise, or again do the Liberal Democrats have a different definition of a front line service?

What is even more galling about the whole announcement is that when you read the detail, they aren’t phasing out the nurse led medical helpline across the whole country. NHS24 and NHS Direct Wales the Scottish and Welsh versions of NHS Direct are continuing, it’s only in England that the nurse led helpline is being dropped in favour of the new NHS 111 service, a service where the staff on the phone will have sixty hours of training rather than nurses who have been through the same degree and level training as any other nurse working in the country. Essentially the English are being palmed off with a cut price imitation, whilst other parts of the UK continue with the full service.

It’s not as if this isn’t a popular service, it handles calls from 14,000 people a day and has been estimated to have saved other parts of the service hundreds of millions of pounds. Certainly on the occasions we’ve used it the choice was to phone NHS Direct, or pack the kids into the car for a trip to the local Accident and Emergency department. We have an out of hours GP service, but that is run by one person and when we have called it we have often had to wait a good while for a call to be returned. NHS Direct have always been a lot quicker in responding, and in a couple of situations where in the early hours of the morning we have been worried about a sick child have given us clear advice and saved us a trip to casualty. They’ve also given Beth advice when she was concerned over drug combinations when she has both been pregnant and also breast feeding – all advice that a telephonist with sixty hours training would not be allowed or qualified to give, and that the out of hours GP would just be too busy to provide. It seems doubtful if a call centre of primarily operators with a much reduced number of professional medical staff will be able to give the same level of service and support that for over ten years the English public have been getting, and the Scottish and Welsh public will continue to receive.

Following the announcement, discussion on Twitter has been taking place under the #savenhsdirect hash tag, and there is already a petition launched at http://www.savenhsdirect.co.uk/ – and there is already speculation that this change might go the way of the abolition of free school milk which was announced and then swiftly U-turned. It’s pretty clear that the axing of NHS Direct wasn’t intended to be announced just yet, so maybe we’ll have Andrew Lansley to thank in a few months for making another goof in letting the cat out of the bag so soon, and giving the Save NHS Direct campaign a chance to get going sooner rather than later!

Is This Really a Top Priority?

As a country we are currently facing billions of pounds worth of cuts, cuts in local services and funding, and as part of that thousands of redundancies for staff across the country including one hundred locally, and what does Eric Pickles (@ericpickles) choose to launch a crusade on? Not the damaging effects of widespread cuts to communities across the country, no, he launches a crusade over unnecessary roadsigns, railings and advertising hoardings.

Now admittedly there are quite a few examples, Flickr have a group with a few gems, indeed the BBC has today highlighted a few including one just down the road from us where Wokingham Borough Council Highways department have, rather than replace an out of date sign, just stuck a new, bigger sign in front of the old one. Messy, but I guess it saved a bob or two, and the council is of course under pressure due to the swinging cuts coming down from central government.

There are numerous, serious problems facing this country – should unnecessary road signs really be a top priority for the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government?